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Gospel Publishing House installs new press

Fri, 07 Jan 2000 - 12:00 AM CST

At 140 feet in length, 12 1/2 feet tall, and weighing nearly 400,000 pounds, the Harris M1000 web press being installed at Gospel Publishing House in Springfield, Mo., represents a major engineering project. It also represents the future of Assemblies of God publishing.

Gospel Publishing House produces some 16 tons of Christian literature a day at the U.S. Assemblies of God Headquarters in Springfield. Since 1979, a Harris M200 web press has been the backbone of this operation, printing the Assemblies of God's Sunday school curriculum and all its major periodicals. Leader of the pack is the church's weekly magazine, the "Pentecostal Evangel," with a press run of about 250,000 copies. Once a month, the foreign missions edition of the "Evangel" prints more than 300,000 copies.

The Harris M200 could only run 16 pages of color in one pass. The "Evangel's" 32 pages of color require two separate runs, each of a quarter million or more copies. The M1000 will run 32 pages of color on the "Evangel" in one pass at speeds up to 40,000 impressions per hour, or 15 per second, eclipsing the current speed of about 22,000 per hour.

"This will almost triple our productivity," said Michael Murphy, Production Operations Center manager at GPH.

By purchasing a reconditioned press from Graphic Innovators of Itasca, Ill., and trading in the M200, the Gospel Publishing House has cut costs significantly. Though reconditioned, the M1000 is outfitted with state-of-the-art components and will increase the quality of GPH publications while dramatically reducing production time. The M1000 will be equipped with two folders, allowing multiple jobs to run through simultaneously. Where the M200 required three shifts filling a 24-hour day to run jobs on schedule, the M1000 is expected to handle GPH's production load in 2 shifts.

"The transition from the M200 to the M1000 poses a challenge for our press crews," said GPH General Manager Arlyn Pember. "We plan to run the M200 until the last possible moment, complete the last job on this press, and shut down with a minimum amount of time before start up for the M1000. Considerable planning and scheduling has been made to ensure this is a smooth transition. Present plans call for a 2-week window where we will change over support systems and conduct test runs. On March 10 we're scheduled to shut down the old press, and on March 27 we're scheduled to run the new press with an issue of the "Pentecostal Evangel" as the first job.

When asked, about the future of Gospel Publishing House, Pember stated, "The Assemblies of God has been printing and distributing Christian literature from its founding in Hot Springs, Ark., in 1914, through the Gospel Publishing House. This recently purchased press is the largest (8 unit), fastest and most versatile. It will allow Gospel Publishing House to better meet the printing requirements of the various ministries of the church. This equipment is the most significant purchase of production equipment over the past 20 years and speaks to the commitment the church's leadership has made toward the printing ministry of the Gospel Publishing House."


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At 140 feet in length, 12 1/2 feet tall, and weighing nearly 400,000 pounds, the Harris M1000 web press being installed at Gospel Publishing House in Springfield, Mo., represents a major engineering project. It also represents the future of Assemblies of God publishing.

Gospel Publishing House produces some 16 tons of Christian literature a day at the U.S. Assemblies of God Headquarters in Springfield. Since 1979, a Harris M200 web press has been the backbone of this operation, printing the Assemblies of God's Sunday school curriculum and all its major periodicals. Leader of the pack is the church's weekly magazine, the "Pentecostal Evangel," with a press run of about 250,000 copies. Once a month, the foreign missions edition of the "Evangel" prints more than 300,000 copies.

The Harris M200 could only run 16 pages of color in one pass. The "Evangel's" 32 pages of color require two separate runs, each of a quarter million or more copies. The M1000 will run 32 pages of color on the "Evangel" in one pass at speeds up to 40,000 impressions per hour, or 15 per second, eclipsing the current speed of about 22,000 per hour.

"This will almost triple our productivity," said Michael Murphy, Production Operations Center manager at GPH.

By purchasing a reconditioned press from Graphic Innovators of Itasca, Ill., and trading in the M200, the Gospel Publishing House has cut costs significantly. Though reconditioned, the M1000 is outfitted with state-of-the-art components and will increase the quality of GPH publications while dramatically reducing production time. The M1000 will be equipped with two folders, allowing multiple jobs to run through simultaneously. Where the M200 required three shifts filling a 24-hour day to run jobs on schedule, the M1000 is expected to handle GPH's production load in 2 shifts.

"The transition from the M200 to the M1000 poses a challenge for our press crews," said GPH General Manager Arlyn Pember. "We plan to run the M200 until the last possible moment, complete the last job on this press, and shut down with a minimum amount of time before start up for the M1000. Considerable planning and scheduling has been made to ensure this is a smooth transition. Present plans call for a 2-week window where we will change over support systems and conduct test runs. On March 10 we're scheduled to shut down the old press, and on March 27 we're scheduled to run the new press with an issue of the "Pentecostal Evangel" as the first job.

When asked, about the future of Gospel Publishing House, Pember stated, "The Assemblies of God has been printing and distributing Christian literature from its founding in Hot Springs, Ark., in 1914, through the Gospel Publishing House. This recently purchased press is the largest (8 unit), fastest and most versatile. It will allow Gospel Publishing House to better meet the printing requirements of the various ministries of the church. This equipment is the most significant purchase of production equipment over the past 20 years and speaks to the commitment the church's leadership has made toward the printing ministry of the Gospel Publishing House."


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Church Dedicates Alzheimer's Facility

Thu, 20 Nov 2014 - 9:53 AM CST

Memory Lane
Van Buren First Assembly of God's Memory Lane Alzheimer's Special Care Unit is considered the finest Alzheimer's facility in Arkansas and one of the best in the nation.

Many Assemblies of God churches care for the needy through food pantries, clothing banks, holiday meals and similar compassion ministries. But Van Buren (Arkansas) First Assembly of God may be the very first AG church to not only offer a retirement center for seniors, but now a fully-staffed care unit for individuals who have Alzheimer's or dementia.

The new $5 million, 34,000 square-foot Memory Lane Alzheimer's Special Care Unit, dedicated on November 13, was recently completed through the donation of a gift of $5 million given anonymously last November. The care unit is an addition to the already existing 60,000-square-foot Legacy Heights Retirement Center.

Senior Pastor Bobby Johnson, who has been ministering at the 1,100-member church for the past 34 years, says that in 2007 the church opened the Legacy Heights Retirement Center, offering 55 units for retirees.

Having converted a wing of the center into an Alzheimer's care unit in 2009, Johnson says at first the church struggled as the economy crash at that time took its toll. "But three years ago, a foundation offered us a $1 million grant, if we could match it," Johnson says. "We matched almost all of it and that helped us recover."

Memory Lane pictures
Much of the decor in Memory Lanes is designed to help those with Alzheimer's use their memories.

Apparently liking what Johnson and Van Buren First Assembly were doing, the same foundation came back to them this past November and offered the grant money to build a state-of-the-art Alzheimer's care facility.

AG General Treasurer Doug Clay spoke at the dedication of the new unit. "Thank you for being a wonderful and biblical example of excellence in ministry to our seniors," Clay said. "There is nothing quite like this . . . praise the Lord!"

When the new facility, which is expected to open by mid-December, is at capacity (40 patients), it will have a staff of 50 to 60 people, including nurses and other professional staff who will provide 24-hour care in private rooms. The facility is also licensed by the state.

"Memory Lane is divided into two mirroring pods of 16,000-square-feet each," Johnson says. "They each have 20 rooms and include a dining room, activities room, a beauty salon, whirlpool, an outdoor walking track within the confines of each pod, and between the pods is a safe room for residents of Legacy Heights and Memory Lane."

Clay observed that one out of eight Americans are now age 65 or older, with more than 5,500 Americans turning 65 every day. "As the percentage of older people in the population increases, problems, attitudes, responsibilities, and care related to the aging become matters of increasing concern," Clay said.

Pastor Bobby Johnson
Pastor Bobby Johnson

Johnson agrees with Clay's assessment. "Statistics say 1 out of 2 people who are 85 will contract this disease — a disease where there are no survivors."

According to what state officials have already communicated to Johnson, the new Alzheimer's facility is the best in the state and is one of the best in the nation.

"The difference is, this facility was built strictly for Alzheimer's patients — it's not an older building converted to house Alzheimer's patients," Johnson explains. "For example, our large outdoor walking track is secure, pictures and decorations are from the 1930s, 40s and 50s, which will help with memory, and each patient's door will have pictures of their family members on it."

What's more, Johnson says, those residents living at Legacy Heights and the patients soon to be a part of Memory Lane will continue to have the opportunities to hear the gospel message, through visitation of retired AG ministers and live-streaming of all church services.

And perhaps Clay summed the church's efforts up best when he said during the dedication, "Thank you for addressing this concern with care, quality and excellence."

For more information about Legacy Heights or Memory Lane, contact Van Buren First AG at info@vbfirst.com.

 

 

Keywords: AG churches
Authors: Dan Van Veen

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