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Bible Quiz -- not just a teens' game

Fri, 23 Sep 2005 - 4:23 PM CST

Assemblies of God National Bible Quiz programs provide outstanding opportunities for elementary students all the way up to senior adults to learn the Word of God in depth through cooperative competition. While Bible Quiz is often thought of as just a teens' game, some churches offer programs to anyone interested -- no matter the age.

First Assembly of God of Greater Lansing (East Lansing, Michigan) has a Bible Quiz team for churchgoers of all ages. In addition to its participation in national programs such as Junior, Teen and Adult Bible Quiz, the church offers an extra level of quizzing called PeeWee Bible Quiz.

The Michigan District started the PeeWee level for kids in kindergarten through third grade nearly 18 years ago. First AG Greater Lansing has been offering PeeWee Quiz to kids for nearly 15 years.

PeeWee participants are quizzed on questions that come from the Junior Bible Quiz (JBQ) Bible Fact Pak. While JBQ kids are quizzed on 10-point, 20-point and 30-point questions that increase in difficulty with each level, PeeWee kids are quizzed only on 10-point questions from the same Fact Pak. The 10-point questions are on basic Bible facts like, "Who was the first man and first woman," for example.

Last year, 17 Michigan churches participated in PeeWee and about 100-120 quizzers attended each event. The young quizzers scrimmage in November and compete in sectional finals in February.

Tammy Scott and her husband Rod are the Michigan District PeeWee Bible Quiz coordinators.

"PeeWee Bible Quiz has been a great way for young quizzers to get started," says Tammy Scott. "The competition level is less intimidating and we try to make it fun. It is a great way to introduce quizzers to JBQ, and it allows them to go into JBQ with experience and confidence."

The top teams at sectional finals can go on to participate in the JBQ state competition in May, participating in the "10s" category and getting a taste of Bible Quiz competition at the state level.

The church, pastored by Curt Dalaba, also has strong JBQ and Teen (TBQ) Bible Quiz programs. Elementary students up to sixth grade study from the JBQ 576-question Bible Fact Pak available through Gospel Publishing House (GPH). The Fact Pak teaches Bible facts, doctrines and includes selected verses for memorization.

"Some of our goals," says Ken Andrews, JBQ coordinator for First AG, "are to get kids excited about God's Word, to start building an interest in the Word, to make sure that they know Jesus, to start a discipline of looking into the Bible daily and to build a foundation in the lives of these kids based on the Bible."

The church has been to five TBQ national finals. Teens around the nation, grades 6 through 12, are memorizing Romans and James this year and can be quizzed on any fact from geography to people, or asked to recite any passage from the two books.

Maureen Harr, TBQ coordinator for First AG for the past 10 years, says the AG National Youth Department offers many resources to help the teens with memorization and Bible facts including the complete Scripture portion for the season, a concordance, a chapter analysis and quote cards to name a few. The resources are available through GPH.

JBQ and TBQ teams that excel in state and regional tournaments will go on to compete in the annual national competitions next summer.

Judy Klein, Adult Bible Quiz (ABQ) coordinator for First Assembly, is a mother of eight and has had children participate in each stage of Bible Quiz.

"My kids in college say Bible Quiz helped them to memorize their course material at school," says Klein. "God blesses them mentally and spiritually that way.

"They also get the opportunity to go on trips and meet kids from other churches across the nation," Klein continues. "The kids encourage one another. It's great fellowship."

Klein loves participating in ABQ because it keeps her dedicated to studying the Bible and it helps her encourage her kids to study their Bible Quiz material. This season, the adults will be memorizing James 1-5. ABQ, for ages 18 and up, is in its third season at First Assembly.

Since there are no study resources specifically for ABQ, teams throughout the country study selected passages from the same Scripture portion booklet used in TBQ. Klein puts together a handbook for her team that includes TBQ practice questions available through GPH.

Klein explains that ABQ is just a scaled down version of TBQ. While TBQ teams compete once a month with practices every week, First AG's ABQ team has optional practices once a month and competes once a year at an event held at the church on a Sunday afternoon in April. A final championship round is held during the evening service and awards are given.

Whether or not state and regional competitions are held for ABQ teams depends on the number of teams in the district and it is up to the district to coordinate them. As of now, Michigan holds no state competition for ABQ, but Klein says she hopes that will change as some Michigan churches have expressed interested in starting ABQ programs.

Any ABQ team may compete in the ABQ national finals held the last day of the TBQ finals -- even if the church's TBQ team does not qualify. ABQ teams pay a fee to participate and all funds raised go towards TBQ scholarships. According to the National Bible Quiz Department, 15 ABQ teams competed at the 2005 finals.

"It's fun to see the young adults in ABQ -- some just out of TBQ -- interact with older ABQers," says Klein of ABQ. "It's really neat to see them encourage one another."

At First Assembly, teens in TBQ are responsible for running the annual ABQ tournament held at the church. They officiate, keep stats, act as quizmasters, resolve any problems that may arise and make playoff decisions. Some TBQ teens are even involved in ABQ practices, training and sharing tips with adults.

Bible Quiz offers opportunities for people of all ages in the church to connect, interact and learn God's Word in a way that is effective and fun.

"As a parent, Bible Quiz helps hold me accountable to teaching my children the Word of God," says Karen Andrews, PeeWee Quiz coach for First AG. "Because of Bible Quiz, my children have memorized more Scripture than I could ever have imagined possible. God has certainly blessed them because of their efforts and His Word will not return void."

For more information on national Bible Quiz programs, visit http://biblequiz.ag.org/. For more details on PeeWee Bible Quiz, contact Michigan District Coordinators Rod and Tammy Scott at (517) 323-3285 or rodtammy@aol.com. Resources are available at http://www.gospelpublishing.com/.


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Assemblies of God National Bible Quiz programs provide outstanding opportunities for elementary students all the way up to senior adults to learn the Word of God in depth through cooperative competition. While Bible Quiz is often thought of as just a teens' game, some churches offer programs to anyone interested -- no matter the age.

First Assembly of God of Greater Lansing (East Lansing, Michigan) has a Bible Quiz team for churchgoers of all ages. In addition to its participation in national programs such as Junior, Teen and Adult Bible Quiz, the church offers an extra level of quizzing called PeeWee Bible Quiz.

The Michigan District started the PeeWee level for kids in kindergarten through third grade nearly 18 years ago. First AG Greater Lansing has been offering PeeWee Quiz to kids for nearly 15 years.

PeeWee participants are quizzed on questions that come from the Junior Bible Quiz (JBQ) Bible Fact Pak. While JBQ kids are quizzed on 10-point, 20-point and 30-point questions that increase in difficulty with each level, PeeWee kids are quizzed only on 10-point questions from the same Fact Pak. The 10-point questions are on basic Bible facts like, "Who was the first man and first woman," for example.

Last year, 17 Michigan churches participated in PeeWee and about 100-120 quizzers attended each event. The young quizzers scrimmage in November and compete in sectional finals in February.

Tammy Scott and her husband Rod are the Michigan District PeeWee Bible Quiz coordinators.

"PeeWee Bible Quiz has been a great way for young quizzers to get started," says Tammy Scott. "The competition level is less intimidating and we try to make it fun. It is a great way to introduce quizzers to JBQ, and it allows them to go into JBQ with experience and confidence."

The top teams at sectional finals can go on to participate in the JBQ state competition in May, participating in the "10s" category and getting a taste of Bible Quiz competition at the state level.

The church, pastored by Curt Dalaba, also has strong JBQ and Teen (TBQ) Bible Quiz programs. Elementary students up to sixth grade study from the JBQ 576-question Bible Fact Pak available through Gospel Publishing House (GPH). The Fact Pak teaches Bible facts, doctrines and includes selected verses for memorization.

"Some of our goals," says Ken Andrews, JBQ coordinator for First AG, "are to get kids excited about God's Word, to start building an interest in the Word, to make sure that they know Jesus, to start a discipline of looking into the Bible daily and to build a foundation in the lives of these kids based on the Bible."

The church has been to five TBQ national finals. Teens around the nation, grades 6 through 12, are memorizing Romans and James this year and can be quizzed on any fact from geography to people, or asked to recite any passage from the two books.

Maureen Harr, TBQ coordinator for First AG for the past 10 years, says the AG National Youth Department offers many resources to help the teens with memorization and Bible facts including the complete Scripture portion for the season, a concordance, a chapter analysis and quote cards to name a few. The resources are available through GPH.

JBQ and TBQ teams that excel in state and regional tournaments will go on to compete in the annual national competitions next summer.

Judy Klein, Adult Bible Quiz (ABQ) coordinator for First Assembly, is a mother of eight and has had children participate in each stage of Bible Quiz.

"My kids in college say Bible Quiz helped them to memorize their course material at school," says Klein. "God blesses them mentally and spiritually that way.

"They also get the opportunity to go on trips and meet kids from other churches across the nation," Klein continues. "The kids encourage one another. It's great fellowship."

Klein loves participating in ABQ because it keeps her dedicated to studying the Bible and it helps her encourage her kids to study their Bible Quiz material. This season, the adults will be memorizing James 1-5. ABQ, for ages 18 and up, is in its third season at First Assembly.

Since there are no study resources specifically for ABQ, teams throughout the country study selected passages from the same Scripture portion booklet used in TBQ. Klein puts together a handbook for her team that includes TBQ practice questions available through GPH.

Klein explains that ABQ is just a scaled down version of TBQ. While TBQ teams compete once a month with practices every week, First AG's ABQ team has optional practices once a month and competes once a year at an event held at the church on a Sunday afternoon in April. A final championship round is held during the evening service and awards are given.

Whether or not state and regional competitions are held for ABQ teams depends on the number of teams in the district and it is up to the district to coordinate them. As of now, Michigan holds no state competition for ABQ, but Klein says she hopes that will change as some Michigan churches have expressed interested in starting ABQ programs.

Any ABQ team may compete in the ABQ national finals held the last day of the TBQ finals -- even if the church's TBQ team does not qualify. ABQ teams pay a fee to participate and all funds raised go towards TBQ scholarships. According to the National Bible Quiz Department, 15 ABQ teams competed at the 2005 finals.

"It's fun to see the young adults in ABQ -- some just out of TBQ -- interact with older ABQers," says Klein of ABQ. "It's really neat to see them encourage one another."

At First Assembly, teens in TBQ are responsible for running the annual ABQ tournament held at the church. They officiate, keep stats, act as quizmasters, resolve any problems that may arise and make playoff decisions. Some TBQ teens are even involved in ABQ practices, training and sharing tips with adults.

Bible Quiz offers opportunities for people of all ages in the church to connect, interact and learn God's Word in a way that is effective and fun.

"As a parent, Bible Quiz helps hold me accountable to teaching my children the Word of God," says Karen Andrews, PeeWee Quiz coach for First AG. "Because of Bible Quiz, my children have memorized more Scripture than I could ever have imagined possible. God has certainly blessed them because of their efforts and His Word will not return void."

For more information on national Bible Quiz programs, visit http://biblequiz.ag.org/. For more details on PeeWee Bible Quiz, contact Michigan District Coordinators Rod and Tammy Scott at (517) 323-3285 or rodtammy@aol.com. Resources are available at http://www.gospelpublishing.com/.


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AG Grows By Attracting New Generation

Mon, 21 Apr 2014 - 4:31 PM CST

As the world continues to vie for the attention of the younger generation, the Assemblies of God is one of the few U.S. denominations where young people are flocking. Statistics indicate approximately 40 percent of the Fellowship's more than 3 million adherents are 25 and younger.

"The Assemblies of God has historically done a good job of keeping the focus on the next generation," says Scott Berkey, children's pastor at Victory Worship Center (AG) in Tucson, Arizoma, and former national director of the Children's Ministries Agency. "When that comes from the top, it trickles down in different ways and in different capacities all the way to the local church level."

Now more than ever, Berkey says parents are doing their homework before they walk into a church with their families and choosing ones that place special emphasis on children. If the church is doing its job by helping children feel connected, then it's the children who will bring their parents back to the church, says Berkey.

"Today's parents predominantly go where their kids want them to go," Berkey says. "The buying power kids have today is unlike any generation before them, and the same holds true as to where they go to church."

Mark Entzminger, senior director for AG Children's Ministries, says this need for connection is of vital importance to children.

"Kids today want to belong and have a place where they fit in and are welcomed, loved, and accepted for who they are," Entzminger says. 

In addition to a nurturing environment, Entzminger says the AG is reaching a hands-on generation, and teaching methods should reflect this whenever possible.

One of the Fellowship's most successful evangelistic outreaches for children, MEGA Sports Camp, gives evidence of this trend. MEGA Sports Camp allows the worlds of sports and faith to collide with positive results. Entzminger says this Vacation Bible School-style outreach typically attracts children who aren't Christians or who come from an unchurched background. The result is often a number of families getting plugged into a local congregation.

When reaching those outside the church, Berkey says it's important to be strategic and create an environment where people want to come and experience why a church is different from other community children's events.

"What separates us from those events is the love of Jesus Christ," Berkey says. "The people in our churches are interacting and sharing the love of Christ with children."

After establishing a foundation built on the love of Christ, children then graduate into local youth ministries. Heath Adamson, senior director for AG Youth Ministries, says the Spirit-empowered gospel is what speaks to their hearts.

"We're firm believers that the most relevant thing today truly is the presence and the drawing of the Holy Spirit," Adamson says. "He always communicates in a language everybody understands, and it is His presence that becomes the impetus that crosses those invisible borders that separate generations."

Adamson says this movement of the Spirit was never intended to remain within the four walls of the church. Through the campus ministry of Youth Alive, students are intentionally being equipped to be salt and light in their schools and to identify key moments they can live out their faith, whether it's in science class or walking down the hall at school.

The goal, Adamson says, is for Youth Alive campus missionaries to not necessarily tell everybody about what they believe, but to have the courage to listen to somebody's story and, through the interaction of the Holy Spirit, allow God to open a door for them to share God's story.

The hope of the ministry is that the participating students will make an impact on the lives of those around them regardless of where their paths take them. Students not only make a difference; they become the difference.

Jay Mooney, executive director of COMPACT Family Services in Hot Springs, Arkansas, (AG) knows all too well the importance of being the difference in the lives of children and youth, particularly those in crisis.

Mooney says a child or youth who comes through the door of COMPACT immediately is shown the love of Christ. Mentors model consistent discipline and love.

Love was what greeted a 19-year-old woman from South Carolina who described herself as a scared, broken child when she stood on the doorstep of COMPACT's Highlands Maternity Home.

Molested as a young girl, she suffered from a sexual addiction that left her unmarried and pregnant; however, she says it was the love of God that changed her life.

From day one, Mooney says caregivers work with troubled children and youth from every angle to influence their lives and heal their wounds by ministering to their whole person — body, soul and spirit.

Such was the case with this young woman, who has ultimately come to experience God's grace and forgiveness.

"It's crazy how God ordered my steps," she says. "Highlands is where God began to turn my life around, and now God is walking me down the road so I can be who He's called me to be."

She is currently enrolled in school and has plans to pursue her credentials to become an AG missionary.

"It was just amazing the love that they had for me," she says. "They loved me past my attitude, and they loved me past my sin. They showed me how Christ sees me."

With this simple, yet timeless message, AG children's and youth ministries are successfully reaching out to and impacting a generation marked by constant change and advancement. 

"At the end of the day, love works," Adamson says. "Walking with Christ works."

Author: Shannon M. Nass, Pentecostal Evangel

 

 


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