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Bible Quiz -- not just a teens' game

Fri, 23 Sep 2005 - 4:23 PM CST

Assemblies of God National Bible Quiz programs provide outstanding opportunities for elementary students all the way up to senior adults to learn the Word of God in depth through cooperative competition. While Bible Quiz is often thought of as just a teens' game, some churches offer programs to anyone interested -- no matter the age.

First Assembly of God of Greater Lansing (East Lansing, Michigan) has a Bible Quiz team for churchgoers of all ages. In addition to its participation in national programs such as Junior, Teen and Adult Bible Quiz, the church offers an extra level of quizzing called PeeWee Bible Quiz.

The Michigan District started the PeeWee level for kids in kindergarten through third grade nearly 18 years ago. First AG Greater Lansing has been offering PeeWee Quiz to kids for nearly 15 years.

PeeWee participants are quizzed on questions that come from the Junior Bible Quiz (JBQ) Bible Fact Pak. While JBQ kids are quizzed on 10-point, 20-point and 30-point questions that increase in difficulty with each level, PeeWee kids are quizzed only on 10-point questions from the same Fact Pak. The 10-point questions are on basic Bible facts like, "Who was the first man and first woman," for example.

Last year, 17 Michigan churches participated in PeeWee and about 100-120 quizzers attended each event. The young quizzers scrimmage in November and compete in sectional finals in February.

Tammy Scott and her husband Rod are the Michigan District PeeWee Bible Quiz coordinators.

"PeeWee Bible Quiz has been a great way for young quizzers to get started," says Tammy Scott. "The competition level is less intimidating and we try to make it fun. It is a great way to introduce quizzers to JBQ, and it allows them to go into JBQ with experience and confidence."

The top teams at sectional finals can go on to participate in the JBQ state competition in May, participating in the "10s" category and getting a taste of Bible Quiz competition at the state level.

The church, pastored by Curt Dalaba, also has strong JBQ and Teen (TBQ) Bible Quiz programs. Elementary students up to sixth grade study from the JBQ 576-question Bible Fact Pak available through Gospel Publishing House (GPH). The Fact Pak teaches Bible facts, doctrines and includes selected verses for memorization.

"Some of our goals," says Ken Andrews, JBQ coordinator for First AG, "are to get kids excited about God's Word, to start building an interest in the Word, to make sure that they know Jesus, to start a discipline of looking into the Bible daily and to build a foundation in the lives of these kids based on the Bible."

The church has been to five TBQ national finals. Teens around the nation, grades 6 through 12, are memorizing Romans and James this year and can be quizzed on any fact from geography to people, or asked to recite any passage from the two books.

Maureen Harr, TBQ coordinator for First AG for the past 10 years, says the AG National Youth Department offers many resources to help the teens with memorization and Bible facts including the complete Scripture portion for the season, a concordance, a chapter analysis and quote cards to name a few. The resources are available through GPH.

JBQ and TBQ teams that excel in state and regional tournaments will go on to compete in the annual national competitions next summer.

Judy Klein, Adult Bible Quiz (ABQ) coordinator for First Assembly, is a mother of eight and has had children participate in each stage of Bible Quiz.

"My kids in college say Bible Quiz helped them to memorize their course material at school," says Klein. "God blesses them mentally and spiritually that way.

"They also get the opportunity to go on trips and meet kids from other churches across the nation," Klein continues. "The kids encourage one another. It's great fellowship."

Klein loves participating in ABQ because it keeps her dedicated to studying the Bible and it helps her encourage her kids to study their Bible Quiz material. This season, the adults will be memorizing James 1-5. ABQ, for ages 18 and up, is in its third season at First Assembly.

Since there are no study resources specifically for ABQ, teams throughout the country study selected passages from the same Scripture portion booklet used in TBQ. Klein puts together a handbook for her team that includes TBQ practice questions available through GPH.

Klein explains that ABQ is just a scaled down version of TBQ. While TBQ teams compete once a month with practices every week, First AG's ABQ team has optional practices once a month and competes once a year at an event held at the church on a Sunday afternoon in April. A final championship round is held during the evening service and awards are given.

Whether or not state and regional competitions are held for ABQ teams depends on the number of teams in the district and it is up to the district to coordinate them. As of now, Michigan holds no state competition for ABQ, but Klein says she hopes that will change as some Michigan churches have expressed interested in starting ABQ programs.

Any ABQ team may compete in the ABQ national finals held the last day of the TBQ finals -- even if the church's TBQ team does not qualify. ABQ teams pay a fee to participate and all funds raised go towards TBQ scholarships. According to the National Bible Quiz Department, 15 ABQ teams competed at the 2005 finals.

"It's fun to see the young adults in ABQ -- some just out of TBQ -- interact with older ABQers," says Klein of ABQ. "It's really neat to see them encourage one another."

At First Assembly, teens in TBQ are responsible for running the annual ABQ tournament held at the church. They officiate, keep stats, act as quizmasters, resolve any problems that may arise and make playoff decisions. Some TBQ teens are even involved in ABQ practices, training and sharing tips with adults.

Bible Quiz offers opportunities for people of all ages in the church to connect, interact and learn God's Word in a way that is effective and fun.

"As a parent, Bible Quiz helps hold me accountable to teaching my children the Word of God," says Karen Andrews, PeeWee Quiz coach for First AG. "Because of Bible Quiz, my children have memorized more Scripture than I could ever have imagined possible. God has certainly blessed them because of their efforts and His Word will not return void."

For more information on national Bible Quiz programs, visit http://biblequiz.ag.org/. For more details on PeeWee Bible Quiz, contact Michigan District Coordinators Rod and Tammy Scott at (517) 323-3285 or rodtammy@aol.com. Resources are available at http://www.gospelpublishing.com/.


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Assemblies of God National Bible Quiz programs provide outstanding opportunities for elementary students all the way up to senior adults to learn the Word of God in depth through cooperative competition. While Bible Quiz is often thought of as just a teens' game, some churches offer programs to anyone interested -- no matter the age.

First Assembly of God of Greater Lansing (East Lansing, Michigan) has a Bible Quiz team for churchgoers of all ages. In addition to its participation in national programs such as Junior, Teen and Adult Bible Quiz, the church offers an extra level of quizzing called PeeWee Bible Quiz.

The Michigan District started the PeeWee level for kids in kindergarten through third grade nearly 18 years ago. First AG Greater Lansing has been offering PeeWee Quiz to kids for nearly 15 years.

PeeWee participants are quizzed on questions that come from the Junior Bible Quiz (JBQ) Bible Fact Pak. While JBQ kids are quizzed on 10-point, 20-point and 30-point questions that increase in difficulty with each level, PeeWee kids are quizzed only on 10-point questions from the same Fact Pak. The 10-point questions are on basic Bible facts like, "Who was the first man and first woman," for example.

Last year, 17 Michigan churches participated in PeeWee and about 100-120 quizzers attended each event. The young quizzers scrimmage in November and compete in sectional finals in February.

Tammy Scott and her husband Rod are the Michigan District PeeWee Bible Quiz coordinators.

"PeeWee Bible Quiz has been a great way for young quizzers to get started," says Tammy Scott. "The competition level is less intimidating and we try to make it fun. It is a great way to introduce quizzers to JBQ, and it allows them to go into JBQ with experience and confidence."

The top teams at sectional finals can go on to participate in the JBQ state competition in May, participating in the "10s" category and getting a taste of Bible Quiz competition at the state level.

The church, pastored by Curt Dalaba, also has strong JBQ and Teen (TBQ) Bible Quiz programs. Elementary students up to sixth grade study from the JBQ 576-question Bible Fact Pak available through Gospel Publishing House (GPH). The Fact Pak teaches Bible facts, doctrines and includes selected verses for memorization.

"Some of our goals," says Ken Andrews, JBQ coordinator for First AG, "are to get kids excited about God's Word, to start building an interest in the Word, to make sure that they know Jesus, to start a discipline of looking into the Bible daily and to build a foundation in the lives of these kids based on the Bible."

The church has been to five TBQ national finals. Teens around the nation, grades 6 through 12, are memorizing Romans and James this year and can be quizzed on any fact from geography to people, or asked to recite any passage from the two books.

Maureen Harr, TBQ coordinator for First AG for the past 10 years, says the AG National Youth Department offers many resources to help the teens with memorization and Bible facts including the complete Scripture portion for the season, a concordance, a chapter analysis and quote cards to name a few. The resources are available through GPH.

JBQ and TBQ teams that excel in state and regional tournaments will go on to compete in the annual national competitions next summer.

Judy Klein, Adult Bible Quiz (ABQ) coordinator for First Assembly, is a mother of eight and has had children participate in each stage of Bible Quiz.

"My kids in college say Bible Quiz helped them to memorize their course material at school," says Klein. "God blesses them mentally and spiritually that way.

"They also get the opportunity to go on trips and meet kids from other churches across the nation," Klein continues. "The kids encourage one another. It's great fellowship."

Klein loves participating in ABQ because it keeps her dedicated to studying the Bible and it helps her encourage her kids to study their Bible Quiz material. This season, the adults will be memorizing James 1-5. ABQ, for ages 18 and up, is in its third season at First Assembly.

Since there are no study resources specifically for ABQ, teams throughout the country study selected passages from the same Scripture portion booklet used in TBQ. Klein puts together a handbook for her team that includes TBQ practice questions available through GPH.

Klein explains that ABQ is just a scaled down version of TBQ. While TBQ teams compete once a month with practices every week, First AG's ABQ team has optional practices once a month and competes once a year at an event held at the church on a Sunday afternoon in April. A final championship round is held during the evening service and awards are given.

Whether or not state and regional competitions are held for ABQ teams depends on the number of teams in the district and it is up to the district to coordinate them. As of now, Michigan holds no state competition for ABQ, but Klein says she hopes that will change as some Michigan churches have expressed interested in starting ABQ programs.

Any ABQ team may compete in the ABQ national finals held the last day of the TBQ finals -- even if the church's TBQ team does not qualify. ABQ teams pay a fee to participate and all funds raised go towards TBQ scholarships. According to the National Bible Quiz Department, 15 ABQ teams competed at the 2005 finals.

"It's fun to see the young adults in ABQ -- some just out of TBQ -- interact with older ABQers," says Klein of ABQ. "It's really neat to see them encourage one another."

At First Assembly, teens in TBQ are responsible for running the annual ABQ tournament held at the church. They officiate, keep stats, act as quizmasters, resolve any problems that may arise and make playoff decisions. Some TBQ teens are even involved in ABQ practices, training and sharing tips with adults.

Bible Quiz offers opportunities for people of all ages in the church to connect, interact and learn God's Word in a way that is effective and fun.

"As a parent, Bible Quiz helps hold me accountable to teaching my children the Word of God," says Karen Andrews, PeeWee Quiz coach for First AG. "Because of Bible Quiz, my children have memorized more Scripture than I could ever have imagined possible. God has certainly blessed them because of their efforts and His Word will not return void."

For more information on national Bible Quiz programs, visit http://biblequiz.ag.org/. For more details on PeeWee Bible Quiz, contact Michigan District Coordinators Rod and Tammy Scott at (517) 323-3285 or rodtammy@aol.com. Resources are available at http://www.gospelpublishing.com/.


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A Centennial Pilgrimage to Hot Springs

Thu, 17 Apr 2014 - 10:36 AM CST

ELT and EP photo in Hot Springs
Holding a historic picture from the 1914 gathering in Hot Springs, current members of the Assemblies of God Executive Leadership Team and some Executive Presbyters pose in the same place as the original photo.

Approximately 300 people gathered in Hot Springs, Arkansas, on April 10-11, 2014, to celebrate the centennial of the Assemblies of God. Echoes of the statements from the founding general council, where another 300 ministers gathered in the same place exactly 100 years earlier, could be heard throughout the two-day event.

The centennial celebration, sponsored by the AGTrust, featured seven speakers and a night of gospel music and worship. The celebration concluded with a pilgrimage to the site of the former Grand Opera House, where the first general council was held, to re-create the iconic photograph of the founders of the Assemblies of God.

One hundred years ago, Hot Springs had a reputation as a wild town, known for its alcohol, prostitution, gangs and drugs. When the founders of the Assemblies of God met at the Hot Springs Grand Opera House for the first general council, they had to pass by the saloon at the front of the building in order to attend the meetings in the auditorium. The centennial celebration was held in a more sanctified setting — the spacious First Assembly of God, Hot Springs, Arkansas, pastored by Larry Burton.

The centennial celebration drew people from across the United States. Jean and Magalie Rebecca, a husband and wife who pastor Haitian Assembly of God, Dorchester, Massachusetts, were excited to be able to participate: "We grew up in the Assemblies of God in Haiti. The Assemblies of God is a worldwide family, and we wanted to represent Haitians in Hot Springs."

Attendees also included descendants of some of the participants in the first general council, held April 2-12, 1914. Bonnie Olsen, the granddaughter of founding Assemblies of God minister Oliver P. Brann, felt right at home. She commented, "I experienced faith-filled services and the power of God this week. I wish I could experience this every day!"

General Superintendent George O. Wood opened the celebration on Thursday by recounting the five reasons for the formation of the Assemblies of God as enumerated in the century-old "Call to Hot Springs." Each speaker continued in this vein, expounding on why the founding principles of the Assemblies of God remain compelling today. Greg Mundis, executive director of Assemblies of God World Missions, shared about the heritage of missionaries who suffered, sometimes unto death, to bring the gospel around the world. Assistant General Superintendent Alton Garrison preached on the bedrock importance of the Word of God.

Hot Springs prayer
Many men and women came forward for healing during the centennial service held at First Assembly of God in Hot Springs.

True to Pentecostal form, the afternoon service included an extended time at the altar. Hundreds of voices were raised in fervent prayer, and people flooded the altars and aisles in the church. Following a time of prayer for specific areas of ministry, Garrison asked those present in need of healing to come forward for prayer. Vocal spiritual gifts were manifested, and several people later testified of physical healings.

Wilfredo de Jesús, pastor of New Life Covenant Church, Chicago, Illinois, encouraged those who are carrying on the Pentecostal legacy to fight complacency in their spiritual lives. "It is essential to build a bridge," he asserted, "so that the younger generation can learn about the power of the Holy Spirit from the older generation." He illustrated this principle with the biblical example of Elijah, the older prophet, who discipled Elisha, the younger prophet. De Jesús pointedly observed, "Elijah and Elisha were from different generations, but they walked together."

Thursday evening, gospel musicians Johnny Minick and Russ Taff led participants in three hours of rousing worship. The music included songs from each decade of the last 100 years. About 40 people - including Wood and Garrison — even participated in a Jericho March, which is a spirited procession around the church in a single file during the worship service. The practice originated in Kentucky Presbyterian camp meetings during the Second Great Awakening and had been adopted by some early Pentecostals.

On Friday morning, three younger ministers spoke — Rod Loy (First Assembly, North Little Rock, Arkansas), Rob Ketterling (River Valley Church, Apple Valley, Minnesota) and Aaron Cole (Life Church, Milwaukee, Wisconsin). They described how Assemblies of God founding ideals are being carried out today and also envisioned the future of the Fellowship.

Following the Footsteps of the AG Founding Members
Attendees of the centennial event make their way up to where the iconic "photo of 300" of the original founders of the Assemblies of God was taken in 1914. Once there, a new centennial photo was taken in the exact same place, re-creating the century-old photo.

The celebration culminated in a pilgrimage to the site where the Hot Springs Grand Opera House once stood. The 300 attendees viewed the new historic marker in honor of the Assemblies of God centennial, which was placed in the sidewalk near Mountain Valley Spring Company, located at 150 Central Avenue. They proceeded to climb the winding trail behind the site of the former Grand Opera House until they reached a small clearing where the iconic photograph from the first general council had been taken.

J. Don George, an Assemblies of God senior statesman and founding pastor of Calvary Church, Irving, Texas, called the centennial event in Hot Springs "a historic occasion that will be long remembered." He noted that the event was relatively small in comparison to the larger centennial celebration slated to be held in Springfield, Missouri, on August 5-10, 2014, in conjunction with the World Assemblies of God Congress. "As a movement we are called to generational, gender, cultural and racial diversity," George stated. When thousands of visitors from across the United States and the world descend on Springfield in August, this diversity will be on full display.

Commemorative Plaque
A historic marker, indicating the historic location of the site of the founding convention of the Assemblies of God, was placed in the sidewalk on Central Avenue in Hot Springs.

The men and women who met in Hot Springs 100 years ago laid a foundation for a cooperative Fellowship that would help Pentecostals to more effectively evangelize the world. One hundred years later, the Assemblies of God has more than 3.1 million adherents in the United States and more than 66 million worldwide.

The centennial gathering offered both a celebration of the past century and a vision for the future. According to George O. Wood, the Assemblies of God, throughout its history, "has been marked by purpose and passion." He explained, "Our purpose is embedded in our doctrine, mission, values and strategies. Our passion comes from the work of the Holy Spirit who continues to empower us to do the greatest work of evangelism the world has ever seen." Wood predicted, "The future for the Assemblies of God is truly as bright as the promises of God."

 

 

Keywords: AG churches

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