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Convoy of Hope responds to tornado disaster; AG churches okay

Mon, 05 Feb 2007 - 6:01 PM CST

Through its local partners, Convoy of Hope was already assessing damage on Friday in several central Florida communities, where a thousand homes were severely damaged and at least 19 people are confirmed dead following last Thursday night's tornadoes.

Along with shipping immediate relief supplies, Convoy of Hope sent staff from its world headquarters in Springfield, Missouri, on Saturday. The assessment teams will determine how Convoy of Hope can best help the area prior to the trucks loaded with relief items rolling into central Florida.

Several churches Convoy of Hope has worked with in the past have already requested Convoy of Hope's presence so that they can better help the area.

According to Ed White, director of Men's Ministries for the Peninsular Florida District Council and point person for the district concerning the tragedy, to his knowledge, no AG churches were damaged by the tornado and no AG members lost their lives. However, some AG members did suffer damage to their homes and the opportunities for meeting needs in the lives of suddenly very needy people are plentiful - churches are responding.

In terms of damage and lives lost, the devastation from the tornado is being compared with that of Hurricane Charley.

On Saturday, two semi-trucks were loaded with 80,000 pounds of bottled water, PowerAde, soup, cereal, soymilk, chips and cleaning supplies and sent to stricken area.

This disaster comes on the heels of Convoy of Hope's response to one of the worst ice storms to ever hit the United States.

For more information on Convoy of Hope or to learn how to assist in meeting victims' needs through COH, see the organization's Web site at http://ConvoyofHope.org/.


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Through its local partners, Convoy of Hope was already assessing damage on Friday in several central Florida communities, where a thousand homes were severely damaged and at least 19 people are confirmed dead following last Thursday night's tornadoes.

Along with shipping immediate relief supplies, Convoy of Hope sent staff from its world headquarters in Springfield, Missouri, on Saturday. The assessment teams will determine how Convoy of Hope can best help the area prior to the trucks loaded with relief items rolling into central Florida.

Several churches Convoy of Hope has worked with in the past have already requested Convoy of Hope's presence so that they can better help the area.

According to Ed White, director of Men's Ministries for the Peninsular Florida District Council and point person for the district concerning the tragedy, to his knowledge, no AG churches were damaged by the tornado and no AG members lost their lives. However, some AG members did suffer damage to their homes and the opportunities for meeting needs in the lives of suddenly very needy people are plentiful - churches are responding.

In terms of damage and lives lost, the devastation from the tornado is being compared with that of Hurricane Charley.

On Saturday, two semi-trucks were loaded with 80,000 pounds of bottled water, PowerAde, soup, cereal, soymilk, chips and cleaning supplies and sent to stricken area.

This disaster comes on the heels of Convoy of Hope's response to one of the worst ice storms to ever hit the United States.

For more information on Convoy of Hope or to learn how to assist in meeting victims' needs through COH, see the organization's Web site at http://ConvoyofHope.org/.


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Centennial Event Services Reach Millions; Thousands More Still Viewing Archived Messages

Thu, 28 Aug 2014 - 2:35 PM CST

Centennial logo

The popularity of the Assemblies of God Centennial services, held August 5-10, were unprecedented for any U.S. Assemblies of God event. Through broadcast, live-stream and simulcast, millions of people tuned in to view the services.

According to Africa's LMTV, more than 40 million viewers tuned in to watch its Centennial broadcasts, while the Spanish network, Unsión, broadcast reached viewers throughout Central and South America. The viewership of the Centennial special on TBN is not known, but TBN reaches millions of viewers each week.

In an effort to join AG churches thorughout the U.S. to the Sunday evening celebration, the Centennial finale featured a live simulcast. 

"We had more than 1,000 simulcast sites signed up to participate in Sunday evening's celebration service," Dr. George O. Wood, AG general superintendent, says. "This represented an estimated 50,000 participants in addition to the thousands in attendance and those watching by live-stream online."

And the popularity of the services continues. Since the conclusion of the Centennial, thousands of people have viewed or downloaded the services from the archived collection found on the 100.ag.org website.

"There has been a great interest in the archived messages," states Lucas Cornwell, media technology analyst at the AG national offices. "If people want to watch or share these videos, they can do so via the 100.ag.org website." 

Cornwell says that a few of the messages receiving strong interest include Sunday evening's concluding service with Dick Brogden, the presentation of The Human Right movement, and the message from South Korea General Superintendent Yong Mok Cho.

For news stories, in both English and Spanish, see the Centennial website and click on the "News" tab or click on "Español" at the top of the page for the news tab in Spanish. In addition, the Jason Frenn and Juan Carlos Escobar services, feature translation, in Spanish and English.

Authors: Dan Van Veen

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