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Sonlight Church and Community Center
The new Sonlight Church and Community Center (AG) was dedicated on November 9, 2014.

Skepticism. Disbelief. Strong opposition. Those were the kind of attitudes that greeted Pastor Chris Boggs and his wife Glenda when they talked about their small church of 40 people building a new church in 2009.

When the economy fell in 2010 and the new church was just underway, the negativity — especially from the religious community — poured in.

And a few months later, when Pastor Boggs felt convicted that the church should be built debt-free . . . .

For the past 15 years, the Boggses have been ministering at Sonlight AG, in Weston, Ohio, a small town with a population of about 1,500. When they first took over the church, it was nearly dead.

"If it wasn't for our home church, Kettering Assembly of God in Dayton (Ohio) supporting us like missionaries for the first few years, we never would have made it," Pastor Boggs says, explaining he also drove a school bus to help make ends meet. The church building itself was far from ideal — small, 14 steps up to the entrance, no alcove area, and no place to grow.

But finally, after extensive preparation and planning, the church decided to build. The challenge was, they did not have much money, no property to build on, and at that time, even home loans were tough to come by.

Struggling to find property to build on, Boggs and the church board requested the help of a former board member. They anointed him with oil, prayed over him, and sent him out to find the property God wanted the church to be built on.

Boggs says God gave them favor with a landowner who had refused all others in their attempts to purchase a prime 5-acre piece of property that sat on the highway intersection. Not only we're they able to purchase the land, but the man they had anointed felt led to buy the property for the church and give the church a substantial gift to begin its building program.

The church itself was also raising funds for the building program and on September 19, 2010, broke ground on the building.

"Our plan was to get a shell up and then as money came in, we would work on it," Boggs says. "Then, whatever was left to do, we would get a loan to finish it up."

Although donations were still coming in from unexpected sources as well as through pledges, it was barely enough to keep the building moving forward. "It doesn't take long to burn through money when building," Boggs admits.

But then the game changed. After attending a Financial Peace University event in January of 2011, Boggs was convicted that the church should be built without debt, meaning no loans. From that point on, the Boggses became cheerleaders, emphasizing the progress, while facing skepticism in the community.

Sonlight Church dedication ceremony
Pastor Chris Boggs (with plaque) and his wife, Glenda, at the dedication celebration.

For the next three years, the church would slowly progress, with God providing key gifts of money and encouragement along the way -- including other AG churches helping out and a friend handing the keys of a Jaguar automobile to the Boggses.

"I drove the car of my dreams for three months," Boggs says, "but then I felt the Holy Spirit convicting me. So, I sold the car, paid off some debts and gave the rest to the church building fund." The donation helped the church raise $25,000 in one offering.

But as progress slowed and frustrations mounted, the Holy Spirit gave Boggs a simple solution. "In a small town, rumors get started and people were saying that the church had gone bankrupt, which wasn't true," he says, "so I painted on our sign, 'Please be patient; we're building debt free.'"

That sign started changing some attitudes. People in the community liked the idea of a church building debt free and more people began to support the effort.

Finally, after nearly four years of fund-raising, encouraging and Boggs' overcoming his own personal frustrations with the never-ending help of his wife, the new church, Sonlight Church and Community Center, was dedicated on November 9 with a healthy, growing congregation of 80.

Boggs says the church has been transformed through the completion of the building.

"I believe our people had the poverty mentality, 'we can't, we're poor' — that is totally gone and has been replaced with 'We can do anything through Christ!'" Boggs says. "There's a difference in their attitude in who they are in Christ and what they can accomplish in Christ. This has really grown their faith!"

As far as where the credit lies for an estimated $1.5 million church being built debt free, Boggs is quick to respond. "There's no way this could have happened without the Lord smiling down and giving us favor. And because of this, I know He has big plans for this church."

The first phase of the new church is actually a gymnasium with classrooms and offices located above it. Boggs says it allows for seating of up to 300 and makes the church available for all kinds of church and community activities. In fact, the church is planning on starting an Upwards basketball league for kids in their community in January.

"I am looking forward to the day when we can put a sanctuary up in front of the gymnasium," Boggs admits, but then adds with a laugh, "but right now, I'm exhausted, so a little break might be good!"


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Wacker collection donated to FPHC

Wed, 17 Oct 2012 - 11:47 AM CST

Dr. Grant Wacker, one of the most prominent historians of American religion, has deposited his Pentecostal research collection at the Flower Pentecostal Heritage Center, which is located in the Assemblies of God national offices in Springfield, Missouri. The Grant Wacker Collection was dedicated in a special service held on Thursday, October 11, 2012, at Evangel University, also in Springfield.

Dr. Grant Wacker
Wacker

Wacker, an Assemblies of God pastor's son, was raised in Springfield. He is the grandson of Ralph Riggs, who served as general superintendent from 1953 to 1959. Wacker earned his Ph.D. at Harvard University and has taught American religious history at Duke University Divinity School since 1992.

Pentecostal history has been one of Wacker's primary research interests, and his 2001 book, Heaven Below: Early Pentecostals and American Culture, has become a standard text on the subject. Wacker is now writing a book entitled Billy Graham and the Shaping of Modern America, under contract with Harvard University Press, but retains interest in developments in Pentecostal histo­ry.

When Wacker began his Pentecostal historical research in 1979, he made a visit to the Flower Pentecostal Heritage Center (then known as the Assemblies of God Archives). He struck up a friendship with the center's director, Wayne Warner, which has persisted to this day. The staff of the Flower Pentecostal Heritage Center provided camaraderie and scholarly assistance to Wacker over the decades. This ongoing relationship, along with his "confidence in the professionalism of the archives handling of donated materials," as he phrased it, led Wacker to place his collection at the archives, which he first visited 33 years earlier.

Evangel University President Robert Spence formally dedicated the collection in Thursday's ceremony, which was held in Riggs Hall, named in honor of Wacker's grandfather. Spence noted, "There are few scholars who have left a greater mark on the landscape of American religious history than Dr. Wacker." Wacker and the former and current directors of the Flower Pentecostal Heritage Center, Wayne Warner and Darrin Rodgers, also participated in the ceremony.
 
The Grant Wacker Collection consists of 13.75 linear feet of files plus numerous books, which together constitute the raw materials from which he crafted his scholarly assessments of the Pentecostal movement. In addressing Wacker, Rodgers stated, "I am humbled that you have entrusted a significant portion of your life's work to the Heritage Center. Because of this donation, future generations will continue to have access to the materials which formed the basis for your scholarship."

Wacker praised the Flower Pentecostal Heritage Center for its significant role in making Pentecostal historical scholarship possible: "The work that historians do is utterly dependent upon the work of archivists. They build the foundation for historians by collecting and cataloging materials and interviewing people. This is what makes interpretation possible."
 
The Grant Wacker Collection takes its place alongside other notable collections, including the sermon notes of evangelist Smith Wigglesworth, the original Azusa Street newspapers, and the personal files of scholars and church leaders such as Gary McGee, William Menzies and Church of God in Christ Bishop J.O. Patterson Sr.

The Flower Pentecostal Heritage Center is the largest Pentecostal archives and research center in the world, featuring research materials spanning the chronological, denominational, linguistic and national divides. The center is attracting increasing numbers of students and researchers to Springfield and also makes its collections accessible through its research website.

Authors: AG News

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