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The popularity of the Assemblies of God Centennial services, held August 5-10, were unprecedented for any U.S. Assemblies of God event. Through broadcast, live-stream and simulcast, millions of people tuned in to view the services.

According to Africa's LMTV, more than 40 million viewers tuned in to watch its Centennial broadcasts, while the Spanish network, Unsión, broadcast reached viewers throughout Central and South America. The viewership of the Centennial special on TBN is not known, but TBN reaches millions of viewers each week.

In an effort to join AG churches thorughout the U.S. to the Sunday evening celebration, the Centennial finale featured a live simulcast. 

"We had more than 1,000 simulcast sites signed up to participate in Sunday evening's celebration service," Dr. George O. Wood, AG general superintendent, says. "This represented an estimated 50,000 participants in addition to the thousands in attendance and those watching by live-stream online."

And the popularity of the services continues. Since the conclusion of the Centennial, thousands of people have viewed or downloaded the services from the archived collection found on the 100.ag.org website.

"There has been a great interest in the archived messages," states Lucas Cornwell, media technology analyst at the AG national offices. "If people want to watch or share these videos, they can do so via the 100.ag.org website." 

Cornwell says that a few of the messages receiving strong interest include Sunday evening's concluding service with Dick Brogden, the presentation of The Human Right movement, and the message from South Korea General Superintendent Yong Mok Cho.

For news stories, in both English and Spanish, see the Centennial website and click on the "News" tab or click on "Español" at the top of the page for the news tab in Spanish. In addition, the Jason Frenn and Juan Carlos Escobar services, feature translation, in Spanish and English.


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Depicted TV romance sours real relationships

Wed, 02 Jan 2013 - 1:45 PM CST

A new study has found that the more a person believes in television depictions of romance, the less likely that individual is to be committed to a real marital relationship.

"People who believe the unrealistic portrayals on TV are actually less committed to their spouses and think their alternatives to their spouse are relatively attractive," says researcher Jeremy L. Osborn of Albion (Michigan) College.

Osborn found that the more a viewer watches skewed representations of TV romance, the more he or she counts the "costs" of a real relationship in terms of losing freedom or focusing on a partner's unattractive qualities. Osborn followed 392 married couples and their reaction to romances in shows such as True Blood, The Bachelor and Two and a Half Men.

The study, published in Mass Communication and Society, suggests that TV typically shows people happily moving from relationship to relationship, with a seemingly endless supply of attractive partners. Further troubling to Osborn is the finding that most viewers don't realize such messages increases their dissatisfaction with their own spouse. Osborn warns that marriage in real life doesn't work like televised relationships.

"As Christians, it is our duty to protect the sanctity of the marital vow and the importance of marriage as a lifelong commitment," Osborn says. "Our marriages should be modeled after the relationship between Christ and His bride - the Church."

Osborn also urges Christians to look to the Bible as a guide for expectations rather than the small screen.

"Our love should be patient and unconditional," Osborn says. "That's not what we see on TV."

Author: Pentecostal Evangel


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