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Southwestern Assemblies of God University (SAGU) now has 13 active online extension sites offering classes across the nation.

Eddie Davis, vice president of enrollment and retention, said, "SAGU has aggressively embraced the strategy of extension sites in order to provide an accessible education to potential students who do not fit the mold of a traditional on-campus or online student."

SAGU extension sites present the unique ability to partner with churches around the country that value accredited college level training as well as practical hands-on ministry experience. In many cases, SAGU's online extension sites allow students to remain close to home and attend college at a reduced cost.

Currently, SAGU is operating 13 online extension sites across the country including: Bethesda Community Church in Ft. Worth, Texas; Christ Church in Ft. Worth, Texas; Griffin First Assembly in Griffin, GA; Impact Now, Cornerstone Church in San Antonio, Texas; Life Church in Germantown, WI; Visalia First Assembly in Visalia, CA; Life Church in Roscoe, IL; as well as six additional locations in Kansas, Pennsylvania, Missouri, California, and Texas. New sites are planned to open in the Spring and Fall of 2015.

Davis continued, "Students are trained not only by highly esteemed, academically qualified SAGU faculty, but also by local church leaders and influencers in the field. The dynamic of extension sites creates an active and exciting learning experience for our students."

Extension sites currently offer an AA in Bible degree or a BA in Church Leadership. For more information about SAGU extension sites, email som@sagu.edu.

To learn more about SAGU, located in Waxahachie, Texas, see its website.


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City hassles woman for feeding the needy

Mon, 07 Jan 2013 - 4:34 PM CST

Millie Ramirez
Ramirez

The Rutherford Institute has come to the defense of an Arizona woman who has been cited for using her property to share free food with the hungry as a means of exercising her Christian beliefs.

Attorneys for The Rutherford Institute intervened after an enforcement officer with the City of Glendale allegedly informed Millie Ramirez that she would be considered a criminal if she continued to use the driveway of her private residence to distribute free food. For seven years, Ramirez has collected donations from area grocers and made them available to needy families by setting up a temporary food bank in her driveway, which she puts up and takes down each day.

Glendale officials insist that Ramirez is violating the city code by storing materials outside her home, citing her charitable activities as being an "illegal home occupation," an "illegal land use," and as unlawfully lacking a "business license." The Rutherford Institute responded that such action violates Ramirez's 14th Amendment due process rights and warned the city about legal action.

The religious liberties organization says Ramirez has been subjected to repeated harassment by city officials, who have issued "compliance notices" stating that she is in violation of Glendale's storage ordinances.

Those provisions are expressly limited to indefinite storage of material goods, and don't apply to Ramirez' temporary use of items for the specific purpose of feeding the hungry, according to The Rutherford Institute.

Author: Pentecostal Evangel


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