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Ebenezer Christian Center food pantry
Ebenzer Christian Center in Sacramento, California, discovered that the hunger that existed in its community wasn't limited to the kids in their children's ministry. The church now distributes enough groceries for 11,000 to 14,000 meals a month.

When Karen Abrego first came to Ebenezer Christian Center (AG) in Sacramento, California, six years ago as an associate pastor, she was a very experienced children's worker and filled with confidence in her ability to reach children for Christ. 

But her confidence was quickly tested and then frustrated. She couldn't seem to get the children's attention, much less get them to settle down. Behavioral issues were rampant. Did the kids just not want to be there? Was it a lack of respect? What was she missing?

"I decided to kill them with kindness," Abrego says. "So, it was an Easter Sunday, and we made silver-dollar blueberry pancakes for the children." Moments later, the light went on for Abrego.

"When the children started to eat, I remembered hearing that sound before . . . it was this moaning sound as they ate — it was the same sound the malnourished children I had cared for in El Salvador made when they were fed," she says.

Albrego realized that many of the children were coming to church hungry.

Ebenezer Christian Center, a member of the Assemblies of God Northern Pacific Latin American District (NPLAD), is located in a low-income, high-crime part of south Sacramento. As Abrego investigated further, she discovered that the nearby elementary school was a Title I school and that 98 percent of the kids attending were on a reduced-rate or free-meal program. 

"The kids were coming to school and receiving breakfast and lunch five days a week, but on the weekends they were food poor," she says. Ironically Sacramento is known as a rich agricultural area, but the people living in the church's neighborhood didn't have the funds or transportation to readily access it — so they did without.

Pastor Dan and Dionna Garza
Pastor Dan and Dionna Garza

Understanding the need, Abrego met with Senior Pastor Dan Garza, and the church began serving healthy snacks to the children on Sunday mornings. They then partnered with a food bank to provide food for families through the church twice a month.

"In February, due to budget cuts, the elementary school lost the support of its food bank," Abrego says. "We went to our food bank and asked if they would pick up the school and its families — they agreed as long as we provided the volunteers." 

Ebenezer Christian Center has an attendance of 350-400. As many of those attending come from the community and understand (sometimes personally) the desperate need of so many of the neighborhood families, the church confidently agreed to the food bank's request for volunteers.

The church now gives away enough food for 11,000 to 14,000 meals each month.

Efraim Espinoza, director of AG Office Of Hispanic Relations, states, "Ebenezer Christian Center, under the leadership of Pastor Dan Garza, serves as a great testimony that the Assemblies of God wants to reach out in compassion to those around it." 

Although some may assume that because the church is a Hispanic church, its community is strictly Hispanic, Abrego quickly clarifies that the area is a "mixing pot" of multiple ethnicities, including Russian, Ukrainian, Filipino, Hispanic, Hmong and Middle Eastern — to name a few. 

Providing healthy snacks for the children on Sunday mornings has been transformational for the church as the children are now attentive. In addition, the food bank has made a huge impact on the church's community. The staff now calls their twice-monthly food distribution from the church their "Friday morning congregation."

Pastor Karen Abrego
Associate Pastor Karen Abrego with two gentlemen from the Ukraine who the church now ministers to through its food pantry.

"The difference between what we do and other food pantries do is that we pray over and with people who come," Abrego says. "The people ask us to pray for their needs. We recently had one woman come rushing in, not worried that she was going to miss getting her groceries, but that she had missed prayer!"

The efforts the church has made to supply groceries to the community has torn down walls, introduced people to the church, and built relationships between the community and church volunteers and staff.

"Now, I walk down the street and people are calling out to me, 'Hey PK [Pastor Karen]!'"

The school has also communicated its thankfulness, saying that children are better behaved and are able to learn more easily without the distraction of hunger. One teacher shared how thankful she was that she could direct parents who were needing food for their families to the church's food distribution at the school. 

NPLAD Superintendent Jesse Galindo affirms the efforts of the church by saying, "We need more pastors like Pastor Dan [Garza] that will empower and support their staff to fulfill the Great Commission through their specific ministry in the local church."

In addition to food ministry, Ebenezer Christian Center also has a ministry to the homeless, taking clothing to the homeless communities every other month; they have brought in registered nurses to give free flu shots; they've helped families register for healthcare; and opened their doors for all kinds of events to meet needs. 

"We're not a mega-church," Abrego says, "but we're consistently chipping away at the rock of poverty and making a difference in families and lives. We've become the hub of our community . . . , and isn't that what the church is supposed to be?"

 


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Imagine conference challenges Chi Alpha staff to dream big

Mon, 14 Jan 2013 - 2:18 PM CST

Northwest University's Jim Heugel
Northwest University Provost Jim Heugel inspires Chi Alpha leaders to not let their dreams be limited, but to dream big.

More than 450 Chi Alpha Campus Missionaries from across the country gathered for a special one-day event in Fort Worth, Texas, on December 31 - following the third World Missions Summit - to begin the new year with a challenge of dreaming big and deep dreams for Chi Alpha.

The event, called Imagine, was based on Ephesians 3:20-21. It included special speakers, breakouts, worship, prayer and Texas-style food and fellowship. This was the third time and largest attendance ever for a one-day Chi Alpha staff conference. 

The conference began with brunch and a video spoof of the popular "Gangnam Style" song, dubbed, "We got XA Style." World Missions Summit 3 Co-Director E. Scott Martin enthusiastically reflected on the summit and the 1,148 students who responded to "give a year [to missions] and pray about a lifetime."

Chi Alpha National Director Dennis Gaylor challenged campus leaders to dream big and deep dreams together, opening with Ephesians 3:20-21, which says, "Now to him who is able to do immeasurably more than all we ask or imagine, according to his power that is at work within us, to him be glory in the church and in Christ Jesus throughout all generations, for ever and ever! Amen."

"We are essentially poised for greatness or decline depending on how we move forward in God's dreams for us," Gaylor said, and compared the human life stages to organizational development.

As a vibrant and growing organization, Gaylor said Chi Alpha must find the delicate balance between spiritual vitality and effective organization. Gaylor challenged the campus staff to commit themselves to God's Word, prayer and to live consecrated lives in the dream God has for Chi Alpha's future. He then announced XAPray, a call to weekly prayer on campus for Chi Alpha nationwide.

Guest speaker, Northwest University Provost Jim Heugel, also used the Imagine theme to outline what Chi Alpha can be.

"It was good listening . . . about dreaming what Chi Alpha can be and look forward to the potential," Clemson University Senior Campus Pastor Joe Holloway said.

Sara Good, a staff member from Idaho State University, expressed, "It is exciting to see where we've come and the impact of the groups."

Imagine conference
Texas-style fun, food, fellowship and outfits concluded the Imagine event.

During the event, eight different breakout sessions were offered to leaders to develop and hone their skills, with the activities concluding with a Texas-style BBQ and other fun activities.

Five campus missionaries were also recognized at the conference, receiving the Missionary Service Award for 30 years of campus ministry service: Eric Treuil of University of Louisiana-Lafayette, Bob Elfers of Eastern Washington University, Michael Mowry of Central Washington University, Resource Director Mike Olejarz and Support Raising Specialist Trainer Gregg Glutting.

For more information on Chi Alpha Campus Ministries, see its website.

 

Authors: Melanie Lynch

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