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Ebenezer Christian Center food pantry
Ebenzer Christian Center in Sacramento, California, discovered that the hunger that existed in its community wasn't limited to the kids in their children's ministry. The church now distributes enough groceries for 11,000 to 14,000 meals a month.

When Karen Abrego first came to Ebenezer Christian Center (AG) in Sacramento, California, six years ago as an associate pastor, she was a very experienced children's worker and filled with confidence in her ability to reach children for Christ. 

But her confidence was quickly tested and then frustrated. She couldn't seem to get the children's attention, much less get them to settle down. Behavioral issues were rampant. Did the kids just not want to be there? Was it a lack of respect? What was she missing?

"I decided to kill them with kindness," Abrego says. "So, it was an Easter Sunday, and we made silver-dollar blueberry pancakes for the children." Moments later, the light went on for Abrego.

"When the children started to eat, I remembered hearing that sound before . . . it was this moaning sound as they ate — it was the same sound the malnourished children I had cared for in El Salvador made when they were fed," she says.

Albrego realized that many of the children were coming to church hungry.

Ebenezer Christian Center, a member of the Assemblies of God Northern Pacific Latin American District (NPLAD), is located in a low-income, high-crime part of south Sacramento. As Abrego investigated further, she discovered that the nearby elementary school was a Title I school and that 98 percent of the kids attending were on a reduced-rate or free-meal program. 

"The kids were coming to school and receiving breakfast and lunch five days a week, but on the weekends they were food poor," she says. Ironically Sacramento is known as a rich agricultural area, but the people living in the church's neighborhood didn't have the funds or transportation to readily access it — so they did without.

Pastor Dan and Dionna Garza
Pastor Dan and Dionna Garza

Understanding the need, Abrego met with Senior Pastor Dan Garza, and the church began serving healthy snacks to the children on Sunday mornings. They then partnered with a food bank to provide food for families through the church twice a month.

"In February, due to budget cuts, the elementary school lost the support of its food bank," Abrego says. "We went to our food bank and asked if they would pick up the school and its families — they agreed as long as we provided the volunteers." 

Ebenezer Christian Center has an attendance of 350-400. As many of those attending come from the community and understand (sometimes personally) the desperate need of so many of the neighborhood families, the church confidently agreed to the food bank's request for volunteers.

The church now gives away enough food for 11,000 to 14,000 meals each month.

Efraim Espinoza, director of AG Office Of Hispanic Relations, states, "Ebenezer Christian Center, under the leadership of Pastor Dan Garza, serves as a great testimony that the Assemblies of God wants to reach out in compassion to those around it." 

Although some may assume that because the church is a Hispanic church, its community is strictly Hispanic, Abrego quickly clarifies that the area is a "mixing pot" of multiple ethnicities, including Russian, Ukrainian, Filipino, Hispanic, Hmong and Middle Eastern — to name a few. 

Providing healthy snacks for the children on Sunday mornings has been transformational for the church as the children are now attentive. In addition, the food bank has made a huge impact on the church's community. The staff now calls their twice-monthly food distribution from the church their "Friday morning congregation."

Pastor Karen Abrego
Associate Pastor Karen Abrego with two gentlemen from the Ukraine who the church now ministers to through its food pantry.

"The difference between what we do and other food pantries do is that we pray over and with people who come," Abrego says. "The people ask us to pray for their needs. We recently had one woman come rushing in, not worried that she was going to miss getting her groceries, but that she had missed prayer!"

The efforts the church has made to supply groceries to the community has torn down walls, introduced people to the church, and built relationships between the community and church volunteers and staff.

"Now, I walk down the street and people are calling out to me, 'Hey PK [Pastor Karen]!'"

The school has also communicated its thankfulness, saying that children are better behaved and are able to learn more easily without the distraction of hunger. One teacher shared how thankful she was that she could direct parents who were needing food for their families to the church's food distribution at the school. 

NPLAD Superintendent Jesse Galindo affirms the efforts of the church by saying, "We need more pastors like Pastor Dan [Garza] that will empower and support their staff to fulfill the Great Commission through their specific ministry in the local church."

In addition to food ministry, Ebenezer Christian Center also has a ministry to the homeless, taking clothing to the homeless communities every other month; they have brought in registered nurses to give free flu shots; they've helped families register for healthcare; and opened their doors for all kinds of events to meet needs. 

"We're not a mega-church," Abrego says, "but we're consistently chipping away at the rock of poverty and making a difference in families and lives. We've become the hub of our community . . . , and isn't that what the church is supposed to be?"

 


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Church repents for attitudes toward former pastors

Wed, 20 Feb 2013 - 3:21 PM CST

Foot washing
Madison AG Pastor Peter Joudry washes the feet of Stephen Perry, who pastored the church from 1985-90 as well as 1995-2007.

When he applied for the job as lead pastor, Peter A. Joudry knew Madison (Indiana) Assembly of God (MAG) had a reputation for mistreating clergy during the past three decades. Nevertheless, Joudry soldiered on through a seven-month vetting process that included a dozen interviews before the congregation elected him in April 2011.

However, by the seventh month of his tenure, old, entrenched patterns began to resurface. By the ninth month, 40 percent of the 260-member congregation had left.

Soon afterward, Joudry invited the four men who had preceded him as pastor during the previous 30 years to a reconciliation weekend at the church.

Even though many of the members who had wounded the pastors no longer attend MAG, Joudry determined to apologize for the offenses committed against the leaders. As an act of contrition, Joudry and his wife, Ruth, washed the feet of pastors and their wives dating back to 1983: Don and Barb Fisher; Stephen and Patty Perry; Ron and Dorene Bontrager; and Chuck and Susie Lynch. Members of the congregation gathered around the guests amid tears and hugs.

Before the foot-washing ceremony, as the four former pastors and their spouses sat on the platform, Joudry led the congregation in prayers of confession and repentance.

"We needed this weekend because of the misdeeds and un-Christlike attitudes that were displayed by our congregation toward these men of God and their families," Joudry says. "They suffered greatly under a yoke of rebellion and control while being here. They left this body wounded and deeply distressed."

At the service, the sins the congregation repented of included gossip, assuming the worst about their pastors, sending the ministers anonymous letters containing un-Christlike comments, publicly maligning their pastors, and causing a strain on their health.

Even though he has been gone since becoming pastor of Lakeview Church in Indianapolis 18 years ago, Bontrager says he still knows three-fourths of the attendees at MAG. He said during his time in Madison he felt like a young, insecure hireling who had to toe the line.

"But all who remain there want to support the pastor; the spirit of control has been broken," Bontrager says. "The service was authentic, encouraging and extremely meaningful."

Joudry credits M. Wayne Benson, founder of Paraclete Ministries, with laying the groundwork for the reconciliation. Benson, who also took part in the ceremonies, served as MAG interim pastor before Joudry's arrival. Benson commended Joudry for his courage and conviction in organizing the event and urged the congregation to pledge their loyalty to Joudry.

The ceremony included a responsive reading by the congregation to resolve future problems in a biblical and Christ-like manner.

"What we do with rumors and accusations will help change the culture of the church," Joudry says.

Author: John W. Kennedy, Pentecostal Evangel

Keywords: AG churches

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